Trusting….

In coach training, we talk a lot about “trusting the client” in several what if scenarios. Like, what if the conversation starts going in a direction that wasn’t part of the agenda-setting – “trust the client” and make it overt that we are “off track.” What if they say they want to work on X but I can see Y is really brimming for them – “trust the client,” share observations and let them choose. Follow their lead. 

As in all things, I then start to wonder about the applicability of this for other things – usually interpreting first, then students, then faculty/colleagues. What does it look like to trust the other party? Now, in the coaching realm trusting the autonomy & agency of the client is specific to the coaching relationship in which we are both there for THEM -they are the point, the agenda, the endgame. But the concept of trusting the other, even in different circumstances is intriguing to me. How about for you?

This morning in my journaling I was writing about the fallacy of, “if I want it done right, I’ll have to do it myself” and that that is not indicative of trusting the other. Trusting their autonomy & agency, trusting their genius, trusting that they bring gifts to the scenario, trusting that they have abilities/skills that I do not have. It is assuming I have the “right” answers or the “best” way to do something. How arrogant!?! 

I want to learn how to stay engaged with other people at the helm, trusting their genius, their abilities, their insight. Not blindly, but trusting that they have more than just a suggestion, they have actual offerings that will work.

  • If I trusted my students, I would….
  • If I trusted my consumers, my actions would….
  • If I trusted myself, I would…
  • If I trusted my colleagues, my actions would….

Questions to deepen your practice:

  • What does trust mean to you? 
  • What would it mean to trust the consumers you serve? The teams you work with? 
  • What would it mean to trust yourself and your work? To trust yourself to be responsible for the good, bad, and ugly? 
  • What is at risk when we do not trust the consumers? What is the benefit when we don’t trust them?

One response to “Trusting….”

  1. I think it’s easier for me to trust someone when I see them upholding the same values as I do. In interpreting, if I know the other interpreter is upholding the value of “do no harm” while forfeiting “autonomy” then it is easier for me to trust them (assuming that was the values I was prioritizing of course.) What I need to work on is acknowledging when there are others that prioritize different values than I do and trusting them. I think it might be easier to trust consumers in my mentoring practice because I see that time as their time, not mine. So I am willing to be flexible and trust that they know what they are looking for. However this runs the risk of neglecting areas that need attention because focusing on those areas will be hard.

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